Butternut Squash: 1 INGREDIENT, 3 CHEF CREATIONS. VOTE FOR YOUR FAVOURITE.


October 5, 2012 in The Ingredient, Butternut Squash: 1 Ingredient, 3 Chef Creations. Vote for your favourite.
Butternut Squash
Butternut Squash: Fall's Comfort Food
BY Gilles Arzur
Executive Chef
Beverly Wilshire, Beverly Hills (A Four Seasons Hotel)
Which of these three recipes look most appetising to you? Vote on your favourite now!
Pickled Squash Salad with Hazelnuts and Quinoa Pebbles
12
VOTES

Pickled Squash Salad with Hazelnuts and Quinoa Pebbles

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Seared Scallops with Butternut Squash, Fennel Pollen and Chickpeas
17
VOTES

Seared Scallops with Butternut Squash, Fennel Pollen and Chickpeas

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Autumn Bar with Squash and White Chocolate Ganache and Hazelnut Nougat
34
VOTES

Autumn Bar with Squash and White Chocolate Ganache and Hazelnut Nougat

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The
Basics

Butternut squash (known to our friends in Australia and New Zealand as “butternut pumpkin”) is one of those ingredients that is quintessentially Fall. And while it’s usually served as a vegetable side at harvest dinners, squash is actually considered a fruit because of its seeds, just like a tomato. As a “winter squash,” butternut is available year-round with a peak season that lasts from early fall through winter in most regions.
SEASON: September to December (North America, Europe); February to April (Australia)
REGION: Australia, Europe, North America, South Africa
TASTE: Sweet and nutty, similar to pumpkin
SELECTION: Look for squash with matte skin and a long neck, which contains the flesh (the cavity and seeds are in the round base)
PREPARATION: Remove the stem end with a sharp chef’s knife and peel skin with a sharp vegetable peeler. Then, cut in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds

Flavour Profile

Local seasonal produce is truly amazing here in California. We take advantage of it all, and try to be imaginative about how we use it.
Sweet and nutty, butternut squash is a favourite to cook with for its versatility and distinct taste. With a flavour similar to sweet potatoes, the fruit itself has smooth skin and creamy, deep-orange flesh, making it easy to purée for a velvety soup or roast for salads and sides. From savoury mains to desserts, squash can grace any and every part of the menu.

Benefits

 
Squash contains anti-inflammatory omega-fats — great for arthritis or asthma sufferers. Its low-fat, high-fibre content also makes this fruit a heart-healthy comfort food. High in beta-carotene, squash can also help protect against eye disease and degeneration. One final bonus? One cup of squash has more bone-boosting potassium than a banana.
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